HeartHealty Omega 3

Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fats commonly found in marine and plant oils. While we need Omega-3, our bodies don’t produce it so we must get it through the foods we eat.

ALA (alpha-linolenic) fatty acid is found in walnuts, soybeans, flaxseed as well as in those vegetables your mom always wanted you to eat, such as kale, spinach, and Brussel sprouts. EPA (eicosapentaenoic) and DHA (docosahexaenoic) fatty acids are found in fish.
Cold-water fish such as salmon, herring, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, and warm water fish such as tuna are a natural dietary source of EPA and DHA Omega-3 fatty acids.

Currently the FDA has not issued a formal recommendation with regard to intake of Omega-3 fatty acids however, the American Heart Association has recommended individuals without documented coronary heart disease consume fish at least twice a week and include foods such as flaxseed and walnuts in their regular diet.

For individuals with coronary heart disease, the American Heart Association advises they consume about 1g of EPA and DHA per day and further suggests those with elevated triglycerides may benefit from 2-4g per day, from a combination of diet and supplements, as prescribed by their doctor.

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